Capture One Pro 10 Promises Faster Image Editing, Accurate On-Screen Photo Proofing

Capture One Pro 10 Promises Faster Image Editing, Accurate On-Screen Photo Proofing

- in Photography News
86
0

It was a year ago today that Phase One announced the previous version of Capture One, but today we get to meet Capture One Pro 10. It’s a full new version number with a variety of new features, including some substantial interface upgrades, new sharpening modes, a heap of new supported cameras and lenses, as well as a very welcomed on-screen proofing tool.

The speed upgrades appear to be across the board—the press material promises swifter operation in all the most common function, even when viewing at 100 percent. They’re also attributing some of the speed boost to the redesigned default interface, which has been streamlined.

In terms of tangible features, Capture One Pro 10 now uses a three-stage sharpening system. A lens tool helps combat diffraction, user-defined creative sharpening allows for specific elements to be sharpened without having to apply uniform adjustments to the entire image (which can cause ugly halos and other problems), and print-specific sharpening options that get extremely granular.

A new on-screen proofing feature lets users preview finished images as they will actually look once exported. It’s not uncommon for a processed raw file to look a little different than what you intended after export thanks to things like color spaces and compression, but this feature limits that to save time and frustration, It’s not just for prints, but also for web images as well.

There’s a whole list of other upgrades coming in the new version of Capture One Pro, and you can see them on the official site.

Users upgrading from Capture One Pro 8 or 9 will pay $99 for the upgrade, while new customers will pay $299. Capture One also offers subscription pricing for the app at $15 per month on a 12-month plan.

With the new Capture One Pro and MacPhun’s recent release of the Luminar software, it will be interesting to see how the raw image editing space shakes out and if anyone can challenge the juggernaut that is Adobe Lightroom.

Source link

Leave a Reply

You may also like

Nikon D5500 review: A good camera, but lacks consistency

We reviewed the Nikon D5500 back in 2015 and